Review Haiku – Wicked Pictures’ Next Friday Night (2012)

Sometimes, during my infinite free time… and oftentimes, during my endless hours shaping college-aged youth of today, I have a little debate going: who’s more detrimental to the survival of humanity, Ke$ha or Katy Perry?

(yes, this is something I think about)

For various reasons having to do with overall message and schtick, longevity thus far, and apparent popularity, Katy Perry is currently winning hands down.

le sigh…

But one Katy Perry-“inspired”ish bit of cultural awesome that is most definitely NOT detrimental to the survival of humanity is Wicked PicturesNext Friday Night (2012).

1596459h

(pictured: buy your copy of Next Friday Night and/or watch it now here)

Written by Stormy Daniels and directed by Barrett Blade, Next Friday Night stars hard-bodied hardass Alektra Blue like you’ve never seen her before – dorky (like uber dorky)… with headgear and braces and colored rubber bands… and glasses and the most ridiculous hair… and a lisp and this unbelievable shuffling gait… and such a perfect “oh my golly gee goodness guys!!” earnestness that you can’t even believe.

The movie is cute!! Here’s the synopsis (cropped from the back of the box so you can see Alektra in full goof mode – top left)…

In case you can’t read the blue text, this is what it says:

Betty (Alektra Blue) has a crush on hunky college football player Ricky (Bill Bailey). Unfortunately she also has glasses, braces, a lisp, and is a social reject…but it’s 1987 and what’s a girl to do? Throw a huge graduation party to get Ricky’s attention, duh! With the aid of the school’s popular girls, who undoubtedly have ulterior motives, Betty hosts the event of the year while her parents are away. Of course, things get out of control and hilarity ensues. Will Betty finally win the affection of Ricky, or will she ruin the one chance at true love that had been staring into her four eyes all along? Join director Barrett Blade in this Stormy Daniels penned story about one Friday night filled with spandex, hair scrunchies, poor decisions, and rad sex!

…and the trailer:

 

There are so many bits of awesome in Next Friday Night… Let’s list them!!

The music and the art direction are fantastic. Barrett Blade and Brendon Miller show off their real life skills as (hilariously camped up) musicians, and Bill Bailey is almost too good at doing “meaty ’80s heartthrob/asshole.” Plus, Seth Gamble’s “Dexter” will bring tears to your eyes as that one boy who loved you before you were hott…

(pictured: the good director, never too serious, with Kaylani Lei and Brendon Miller)

But the hands down star here is Alektra, who showcases a character that is so far removed from who/what we ordinarily get to see it’s almost unbelievable. And though the whole “noteworthy for allowing one’s self to be presented as less than stellar desirable” thing may be invoked in her “Betty” (e.g. see Sunny Leone in Gia: Portrait of a Pornstar), I don’t think that’s what this is.

Because dorky is one thing… endearing is another.

(pictured: if only we could all be this awesome…)

With Performances By…

Alektra Blue, Kaylani Lei, Nikki Delano, Stevie Shae, Tiffany Tyler, Barrett Blade, Bill Bailey, Brendon Miller, Marco Rivera, and Seth Gamble.

Wicked PicturesNext Friday Night was directed by Barrett Blade and released in January, 2012. The feature comes with five sex scenes and one bonus (DVD only).

Buy your copy here.

…and in case you’re curious, here’s Katy Perry’s original “Last Friday Night.” I actually think Ms. Perry may get some “less evil” points in the Dr. Chauntelle handbook by proxy of Next Friday Night‘s awesomeness – hopefully she’s sends Alektra et al a thank you note.

 

* * *

Review Haiku – nifty notes on noteworthy content from PVV!!

Like what you see? Follow PVV on Facebook and Twitter and/or follow Dr. Chauntelle at @DrChauntelle!!

You may quote anything herein with the following attribution: “Reprinted from Porn Valley Vantage/PVVOnline, copyright © Chauntelle Anne Tibbals, PhD (www.PVVOnline.com).”

PVVOnline – Critical Commentary on Adult Production