PVV – absurd sex myths we learn from porn…?

This article entitled “The Absurd Myths Porn Teaches Us About Sex” (originally published on AlterNet.org on March 26, 2012) has been floating around the interwebs for the past couple of days, and I feel a little conflicted about it.

Let’s check out the text, with my random comments [inserted in brackets throughout] and more general comments at the end…

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“The Absurd Myths Porn Teaches Us About Sex”

Young people who have learned about sex from watching porn have a treasure trove of sadly mistaken beliefs and misconceptions about sexuality.

When Lynette, a college student, first hooked up with an ex-boyfriend, she came face to face with the unrealistic ideals mainstream porn can create about sexuality.

“I had a boyfriend who didn’t realize that women had pubic hair,” she tells us in an interview. “Because he had only watched porn, he had never seen a naked woman outside of porn, so he just sort of failed to realize they had pubic hair.”

“This came up somewhat before my pants came off,” she added, “so you can realize how awkward this was.” She paused. “His face was memorable. In an ‘oh God, what is wrong with me, I am never taking my pants off in front of anyone ever again’ way.”

[seriously? only if the guy in question had only ever seen a small handful of carefully selected porn performers’ vaginas at particular moments can I believe this. though that’s possible, it’s not probable]

Porn has become immensely popular in the last century. With the rise of Internet pornography, no longer do you have to enter a sleazy sex shop in a shady part of town to witness an astonishing panoply of sex acts. A quick Google brings you sex acts from the mundane (happy amateur couples having missionary intercourse) to the bizarre (could looners, who have a sexual fetish for balloons, ever have met each other outside the Internet?). Many teenagers have their first introduction to sex from the glow of a computer screen.

[I’m sensing a little bit of judgement directed towards “looners” here – isn’t it a good thing that folks with common interests have the capacity to connect with one another via the interwebs? and I hate to bring up the obvious yet again, but unless those teenagers are 18 or 19 years old, they’re not supposed to be watching porn in the first place]

And these days, it can lead to some hilarious misconceptions.

Learning About Sex from Porn

Despite Rick Santorum’s newly declared war on porn, porn is not evil. Alan McKee, an Australian university professor and pornography researcher, tells AlterNet, “Pornography is good at teaching lifelong learning, open communication, that sexual development should not be aggressive, coercive, or joyless, self-acceptance, awareness and acceptance that sex is pleasurable, and competence in mediated sexuality.” In short, he claims that pornography can be the foundation to a healthy sex life—not to mention leading to many solo orgasms.

The problem is, learning about sex from porn is like learning about firearms from action movies. Action movies sacrifice realism for the sake of storyline or a really cool explosion. Action movies don’t teach you gun safety. Action movies don’t talk about alternatives to violence. And action movies use some tropes—such as the infinite ammo supply—that may move the story along but don’t reflect reality. That’s not a problem, as long as everyone treats them as entertaining fantasies.

[this is a perfectly reasonable and valid point – learning about firearms from action movies would be silly because action movies are not teaching tools for firearm use. porn, like action movies, is there for entertainment and fantasy. learning about sex from porn would be learning about firearms from action movies – not a good idea]

Unfortunately, for many young people becoming sexually active today, the entertaining fantasies of mainstream porn are the teacher they’ve spent the most time with, and mainstream porn is a terrible teacher.

[yes… but again with the judgement – porn is not a teacher, terrible or otherwise. you can’t evaluate the quality of someone’s job performance when their workplace duties have been assigned through misappropriated use, and you can’t judge porn’s effectiveness as a sex education tool when that’s totally not what it is made for. perhaps a statement along the lines of “young people, who may not be qualified to engage adult content in the first place, misappropriate its intended use, which can have disastrous results”]

Talking to various young people about porn and sexuality, we quickly discovered a treasure trove of sadly mistaken beliefs about sex. A teenage boy who believed that all women, no matter how much they protested otherwise, really wanted to be called sluts when they had sex. Guys who think that foreplay is just jamming a few fingers up someone’s vagina before sex. People who didn’t know you need lube to have anal sex.

[…repeat same counterpoints…]

“I’ve met more than a few guys who were very surprised to discover that women more often masturbate by humping their hands or rubbing their clits than by penetrating themselves,” blogger Holly Pervocracy said.

“I actually had a guy tell me I was wrong,” Lynette said. “If I was rubbing my clit, it wasn’t real masturbation. He didn’t even know about the G spot; he thought I should be getting off on the friction of my fingers with my vagina.”

[unfortunately, lots of people are unfamiliar with human bodies… female ones and male ones and even their own. this is a sadly unfortunate comment on all sorts of social ails surrounding eduction, sex education, and our own societal dis/regard of sex. to bring this up in the context of porn without full development is both spurious and made of straw]

Women aren’t the only ones who fall victim to glaring anatomical mistakes. The giant, ever-hard, pounding penises of male mainstream porn stars are equally unrealistic. “My first boyfriend told me, in all seriousness, that he was pretty small—just seven and a half inches,” said Pervocracy. “He thought nine was average.”

Lynette agrees. “I talked to a guy who said that he thought he was average, he didn’t know, maybe he was on the small side. Really played it up,” she said. “Finally he admitted that he was eight inches. I burst out laughing. Ashamed, he looked at me and asked ‘is that that small?’”

[…repeat same counterpoints…]

These myths about sexuality might seem humorous, but they hide a tragic truth. A generation of teenagers grew up under Bush’s record-breaking funding for abstinence-only sex education.

[thank goodness we are finally getting at the real issue/problem/etc!!!]

Although Obama has eliminated funding for abstinence-only and funded evidence-based comprehensive sex education, the damage has already been done. And both Santorum and Romney, the frontrunners for the GOP nomination, favor abstinence-only sex education—despite the evidence that it delays loss of virginity only eight months. According to research at the Guttmacher Institute, the rates of pregnancy and STIs among teenagers who received abstinence-only sex education are far greater than the rates among those who didn’t.

Even so-called comprehensive sex education is deeply limited. Often, it focuses on STIs and condoms to the exclusion of any other topic. Even basic ideas like queerness or consent are usually neglected. In my comprehensive sex education, we labeled a diagram of the vulva that didn’t have the clitoris on it—no wonder some people think that women are supposed to get off on friction with their vagina! In such a limited sex education, you can forget about having someone’s misapprehensions about penis size or the prevalence of the female orgasm corrected.

[great points, but now you’ve got me wondering – why emphasize porn in the title and lead in? why not focus on the actual issue: education. porn can certainly be referred to as a relevant secondary, illustrative point, but why set up this “porn is awful” piece? I have a guess, and it has to do with sensationalism and traffic… #justsayin)

Admittedly, even in the absence of good sex education, only a small percentage of people who use porn use it to figure out how sex “really works.” Most of the teens who use porn use it for the same reason anyone else does—arousal, masturbation and orgasms. Nevertheless, the lessons that mainstream porn teaches when no one knows that they’re learning from it may be just as disheartening.

Susie Bright, in The Pride of Miss Kitty MacKinnon, famously compared many people who criticize the problematic aspects of mainstream porn to people who taste several glasses of salt water and insist only one of them is salty. However, that glass of saltwater is still salty, and porn still has many racist, sexist and queerphobic elements. Even worse, in the absence of truly comprehensive sex education, many people may believe that real sex is somehow supposed to reflect those elements.

[although phrased in a confusing way, I think a good point is being made here: porn has many problematic elements to it (so does everything). these problematic elements vary per “glass of salt water,” as well as with consumers and producer intent (and probably many other ways)]

“Porn gives us the wonderful ‘she-male’ and ‘chicks with dicks’ names… I’d consider it a misconception because people think those are legitimate things to call us,” trans activist Ami Angelwings says. “Asian trans women porn gave a former boyfriend of mine the idea that trans women were prettier and passed better than white ones which led him to remark ‘Asian guys make the best women’ (and yes that’s when I broke up with him).”

[the first part of this quote is interesting. as you all may know, I have a difficult time with the attribution “tranny“… but many others, TS performers and otherwise, do not. TS performer Wendy Williams has offered much discussion about “tranny” as a product marker, stating that it helps people understand what they’re purchasing/accessing… it’s interesting to consider these things, and the fact that what may make one person uncomfortable may not impact another in the slightest]

“The majority of guys who fetishize Japanese women are clearly getting it from anime porn,” Pervocracy said, “and will be very disappointed if their Japanese woman turns out not to be childlike, whimperingly submissive, or cartoonishly cutesy.”

[wtf!!? please substantiate this statement!!]

“I think the porn that plays into the submissive Asian girls thing is more the Asian porn produced in the US… these often exotify Asian women,” Angelwings said.

She added, “I know more than a few people who have intuited through the differences in expression in women in Japanese porn (vs. US porn) that Japanese men get off on rape.”

Some people object to the idea that a private fantasy in the boundaries of one’s own mind is something other people ought to be concerned with. However, a person’s private sex life is much different than treating trans women as “chicks with dicks” or Japanese women as childish and submissive in media distributed around the globe. A fantasy is one thing; perpetrating degrading and inaccurate stereotypes is quite another. Whatever their flaws, most schools at least try to convey the idea that you shouldn’t stereotype people based on their race or gender identity, a distinct plus over porn.

[what is even being talked about here?!!: “Whatever their flaws, most schools at least try to convey the idea that you shouldn’t stereotype people based on their race or gender identity, a distinct plus over porn.” I don’t understand this sentence in the context of this article at all]

Equally troublesome is the clean, packaged image of sex sold within mainstream pornography. Within the world of mainstream porn, erections appear upon request and continue until their owner wishes for the sex to end, at which point the orgasm is prompt. Sex positions and acts are chosen for how they look on camera, not how they feel to the participants. Everyone is constantly up for sex, with no negotiation between fluctuating libidos required. No one ever experiences vaginal farting or can’t get the penis in no matter what they do or falls off the bed.

[…and Tom Cruise can jump from building to building in the Dubai wind and starving Katniss Everdeen can hit every moving target with a home-made arrow (actually, she totally can Mockingjay!!) and it totally makes sense that Channing Tatum is an undercover cop going back to high school and…]

Porn is a fantasy. Fantasies are supposed to be unrealistic. To depict the fluffers or the multiple retakes or the porn star getting the hair waxed off her ass would ruin the movie. Genuine sex education could teach people that erections and orgasms are often unpredictable, that acrobatic sex positions aren’t always necessary for good sex, that libidos differ, and that sometimes mistakes happen in sex…

[yes!!!!]

…But in its absence, the fantasy of porn—and the fantasy that porn is not a fantasy—can lead to unrealistic beliefs about how sex works.

[perhaps… but this argument says many problematic things about the viewer’s critical capacity – in a world where there is no longer drivers’ training in schools, do kids look to Too Fast and Furious (or whatever) for suggestions? is the notion that someone is too clueless to distinguish between fantasy and reality problematic in of itself? however, in a total dearth of information about “driving,” perhaps something – anything – featuring a car becomes plausible?]

That’s the advantage of truly comprehensive sex education. Of course, it can reveal that women are often not multiorgasmic and how to have safer sex, and that’s valuable. But, more importantly, truly comprehensive sex education can point out the diversity of sex: people have different bodies, different desires and different abilities; it’s not that the sex presented in mainstream porn is the best and other people’s sex is less good, but that there are thousands of possible and enjoyable sex lives. Sex is human and weird and often quite funny, and that’s a side of it that porn rarely shows.

[gah!! why do good points have to continuously be ruined by bringing this back to porn??]

“Porn also hid from me the existence of sexual moods beyond ‘passionate’ or ‘dominating,’” Holly Pervocracy said. “It wasn’t until I got out into the sexual real world that I understood the idea you could have sleepy sex, that you could have silly giggling sex, that you could have quick morning sex or slow evening sex, that you could have romping goofy sex with your shirts or socks still on, that you could have cuddly sex, that you could have comfort-sex when one of you is sad, that you could have ‘hm, let’s see if this works’ experimental sex, that you could have sweetly awkward nerd-sex, that you could have gleefully competitive athletic sex.”

And she adds, “It wasn’t until I got out in the sexual real world that I knew you could smile during sex.”

[fucking seriously? I guess Holly must’ve been watching the exact same small handful of carefully selected content that Lynette’s ex-boyfriend had used to round out his education on the female anatomy…]

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(pictured: this kid is obviously learning about sex from porn)

So what do I think about this piece?

First and foremost, I appreciate it. As difficult as it was to wrap my mind around some of the quotes being offered up, these are people’s experiences. If someone feels that she learned there was no smiling during sex from watching porn, I feel both saddened that this was her experience (imagine, the idea that there is no joy allowed during sex… certainly many people experience this, and it really is a tragedy) and amazed by the endless ways in which one static text (ie one sample adult film) can be interpreted. Reception is such a powerful thing.

And two nutshells…

1. This article is not about porn. It’s about sex education, our society’s lack thereof, and the problems that may result. The author should have highlighted that argument and then discussed any number of “impact” and/or effect points: porn being misappropriated as a sex education tool, unintended pregnancy, poor sex-related physical health, etc etc…

2. …but instead, the authors chose to sensationalize with an often confusing and regularly forced discussion of porn, a discussion that was reliant on anecdotal information that served to perpetuate stereotypes more than anything else. Although individuals’ experiences are valid and important, anecdote does not mean data (which is the gist of what Jesse Fischer said to Gail Dines at 2011’s Cambridge porn debates hehe).

In the end, this article was more “meh” than “yay” – rather than move us toward tackling the issue of sex education (and our blatant lack thereof), it perpetuates more damaging misconceptions about porn, media, and consumer interactions.

(pictured: I want tickets to this play!!)

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